Author Archives: Morrill Memorial Library

4th Annual Volunteer Appreciation Tea

Volunteer TeaOn Thursday, February 12th from 11:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. we invite all library volunteers to our Fourth Annual Volunteer Appreciation Tea.

Staff members and members of the Board of Library Trustees will make sweet treats and serve coffee and tea. We invite all past and current Friends of the Library, Literacy, Outreach and other library volunteers.  Cookbooks and the recipes for these desserts will be on display.

If you are interested in volunteering at the library, we have a few opportunities that we can discuss with you. Please be sure to attend the tea.

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Airport: A Local Experience by Vicki Andrilenas

Victoria Andrilenas is an Information Services Librarian at the Morrill Memorial Library in Norwood, Massachusetts. Read Vicki’s column in the January 15, 2015 edition of the Norwood Transcript and Bulletin.

My husband and I moved to Norwood a few years ago and have enjoyed learning about the town and community.  One local feature that was a nice surprise for me is Norwood Airport.  I grew up near a small airport and my family has long been interested in aviation and airplanes.  For me the noise of planes flying overhead brings back memories of being out in the backyard during the summer and looking up to see what kind of plane was overhead; one summer there were some gliders which was exciting. (more…)

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New Year? – by Liz Reed

Liz Reed is the Adult and Information Services Library at the Morrill Memorial Library in Norwood, Massachusetts. Read Liz’s column in the January 8, 2015 edition of the Norwood Transcript and Bulletin.

Happy New Year!  Well, maybe not so new.  Depending on where you are in the world and your cultural heritage, January 1st may or may not be the New Year you celebrate.  In fact, designating January 1st as the start of the year is fairly recent, and Western, in world history.  I dug into our Reference collection to learn more.

According to the “Holidays, Festivals, and Celebrations of the World Dictionary,” there are 10 different major calendar systems used in the world today, and these calendars determine, among other holidays, when the New Year falls.  These various calendars are either lunar (based on movements of the moon), solar (based on movements of the sun), or lunisolar (simultaneously lunar and solar).  There are many more national, regional, religious, and civil variations among these calendars than can be covered in one article, but in general terms the calendars are: Julian, Gregorian, Jewish, Islamic, Hindu, Buddhist, Chinese, Mayan and Aztec, Baha’i, and Zoroastrian (which has three calendars). (more…)

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No Need to Wait for the New Year – by Jillian Goss

Jillian Goss is a graduate student of library science at Simmons College in Boston while she also works as a Library Assistant at the Morrill Memorial Library in Norwood, Massachusetts. Read Jillian’s column in the January 1, 2015 edition of the Norwood Transcript and Bulletin.

As the new year blossoms, the trope of New Year’s resolutions overwhelm us. We quickly assess our lives and find them lacking just in time for a clean slate. Just like the first fresh page of a new notebook, there’s so much opportunity to the new year. Maybe I’ll get in shape and lose that weight this year, maybe I’ll read “War and Peace,” maybe I’ll quit smoking, or finally organize my shoe collection. All of these are great ideas but usually by Feb. 1 they end up crumpled in a corner. So how do we make New Year’s resolutions stick?

First of all we need to throw out the idea of New Year’s resolutions (I know it sounds counterintuitive, just stick with me). The appeal of New Year’s for changes is simply an engrained tradition, it’s much more difficult to face your problems on a random day of the week. Resolutions for the new year actually go back further than you’d think. The ancient Romans used to make promises of what they would accomplish in the new year to the god Janus: the god of transitions. Their resolutions probably weren’t much different from what ours are today. In ancient Babylon there were numerous religious ceremonies that involved promising good deeds and repaid debts in the coming year. (more…)

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